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Straight Scoop on Cloud Based Services

NetCarrier Wins Coveted VSA SIP Award From ChannelVision

by William Hoover on 03/21/15

Hoover Enterprises is proud to be the West Coast Channel partner for NetCarrier.

February 17, 2015 - Lansdale, PA - ChannelVision Magazine has announced the 2015 Visionary Spotlight Award Winners, and NetCarrier has won the SIP Award for the unique nature of their nCloud PBX platform.

 

nCloud PBX is based around native SIP architecture, allowing for IP phones on the same Local Area Network to communicate with each other, without needing the PBX to anchor the call. This is done without an on-premise server or call control unit; the phones communicate via switch ports, after the call setup is handled by the PBX in NetCarrier's nCloud network.

 

"We have created the Visionary Spotlight Awards program to highlight the rapid pace of evolution within the communications industry, to give innovators and industry visionaries the opportunity to gain the exposure and recognition that they deserve," said Berge Kaprelian, president of Beka Publishing. "We are seeing breathtaking changes in both business models and the technology itself."

 

NetCarrier's nCloud platform is available in all 48 continental United States, and is only distributed through its agent channel.

 

"We are and will continue to be a channel based organization," said Bruce Wirt, NetCarrier's Vice President of Channel Sales. "Our partners are our life blood; they are the reason for our success over the last 18 years. We are extremely proud of this award, and excited for the continued growth of our platform."

 

Agents and VARs can sell NetCarrier's nCloud product suite by utilizing one of three Platinum Master agents, including Chorus Communications in Philadelphia, TBI in Chicago, or Converged Network Services Group in Charlotte.

 

 

About NetCarrier

NetCarrier, founded in 1996, sells both traditional and cloud based voice and data in all 48 continental United States. NetCarrier is a well funded, privately held company operating with positive earnings.  They offer customers quality solutions and peace of mind in a complex telecom marketplace. NetCarrier's mission is: With integrity, superior communication, custom solutions, and savings, NetCarrier will exceed the highest expectations of the most demanding buyer of telecommunications services. For more information, please visit www.netcarrier.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/netcarrier.ncloud 

 

About ChannelVision

ChannelVision is a highly focused and efficient way for service providers and hardware and software companies to reach experienced channel partners targeting the small/medium business space. More than two-thirds of ChannelVision's subscribers (plus an additional and growing Web-based readership) are telecom agents and equipment VARs. For more information visit www.channelvisionmag.com 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hoover Enterprises is proud to be the West Coast Channel Partner for NetCarrier

February 17, 2015 - Lansdale, PA - ChannelVision Magazine has announced the 2015 Visionary Spotlight Award Winners, and NetCarrier has won the SIP Award for the unique nature of their nCloud PBX platform.

 

nCloud PBX is based around native SIP architecture, allowing for IP phones on the same Local Area Network to communicate with each other, without needing the PBX to anchor the call. This is done without an on-premise server or call control unit; the phones communicate via switch ports, after the call setup is handled by the PBX in NetCarrier's nCloud network.

 

"We have created the Visionary Spotlight Awards program to highlight the rapid pace of evolution within the communications industry, to give innovators and industry visionaries the opportunity to gain the exposure and recognition that they deserve," said Berge Kaprelian, president of Beka Publishing. "We are seeing breathtaking changes in both business models and the technology itself."

 

NetCarrier's nCloud platform is available in all 48 continental United States, and is only distributed through its agent channel.

 

"We are and will continue to be a channel based organization," said Bruce Wirt, NetCarrier's Vice President of Channel Sales. "Our partners are our life blood; they are the reason for our success over the last 18 years. We are extremely proud of this award, and excited for the continued growth of our platform."

 

Agents and VARs can sell NetCarrier's nCloud product suite by utilizing one of three Platinum Master agents, including Chorus Communications in Philadelphia, TBI in Chicago, or Converged Network Services Group in Charlotte.

 

 

About NetCarrier

NetCarrier, founded in 1996, sells both traditional and cloud based voice and data in all 48 continental United States. NetCarrier is a well funded, privately held company operating with positive earnings.  They offer customers quality solutions and peace of mind in a complex telecom marketplace. NetCarrier's mission is: With integrity, superior communication, custom solutions, and savings, NetCarrier will exceed the highest expectations of the most demanding buyer of telecommunications services. For more information, please visit www.netcarrier.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/netcarrier.ncloud 

 

About ChannelVision

ChannelVision is a highly focused and efficient way for service providers and hardware and software companies to reach experienced channel partners targeting the small/medium business space. More than two-thirds of ChannelVision's subscribers (plus an additional and growing Web-based readership) are telecom agents and equipment VARs. For more information visit www.channelvisionmag.com 

 

 

 

 

HISTORY OF THE CAR RADIO

by William Hoover on 11/15/14

 

Seems like cars have always had radios but they didn't.

 

One evening, in 1929, two young men named William Lear and Elmer Wavering drove their girlfriends to a lookout point high above the Mississippi River town of Quincy, Illinois, to watch the sunset.

 

It was a romantic night to be sure, but one of the women observed that it would be even nicer if they could listen to music in the car. Lear and Wavering liked the idea.  Both men had tinkered with radios (Lear served as a radio operator in the U.S. Navy during World War I) and it wasn't long before they were taking apart a home radio and trying to get it to work in a car.  

 

 

But it wasn't easy: automobiles have ignition systems, generators, spark plugs, and other electrical equipment that generate noisy static interference, making it nearly impossible to listen to the radio when the engine was running.

 

 

One by one, Lear and Wavering identified and eliminated each source of electrical interference.  When they finally got their radio to work, they took it to a radio convention in Chicago.

 

 

There they met Paul Galvin, owner of Galvin Manufacturing Corporation.  He made a product called a "battery eliminator", a device that allowed battery-powered radios torun on household AC current.  But as more homes were wired for electricity, more radio manufacturers made AC-powered radios.

 

 

Galvin needed a new product to manufacture. When he met Lear and Wavering at the radio convention, he found it.  He believed that mass-produced, affordable car radios had the potential to become a huge business.  Lear and Wavering set up shop in Galvin'sfactory, and when they perfected their first radio, they installed it in his Studebaker.

 

 

Then Galvin went to a local banker to apply for a loan. Thinking it might sweeten the deal, he had his men install a radio in the banker's Packard.  Good idea, but it didn't work. Half an hour after the installation, the banker's Packard caught on fire. (They didn't get the loan.)

 

 

Galvin didn't give up. He drove his Studebaker nearly 800 miles to Atlantic City to show off the radio at the1930 Radio Manufacturers Association convention.  Too broke to afford a booth, he parked the car outside the convention hall and cranked up the radio so that passing conventioneers could hear it.  That idea worked -- He got enough orders to put the radio into production.

 

 

WHAT'S IN A NAME

 

 

That first production model was called the 5T71.

 

 

Galvin decided he needed to come up with something a little catchier.  In those days many companies in the phonograph and radio businesses used the suffix "ola" for their names - Radiola, Columbiola, and Victrola were three of the biggest.

 

Galvin decided to do the same thing, and since his radio was intended for use in a motor vehicle, he decided to call it the Motorola.

 

 But even with the name change, the radio still had problems:

 

When Motorola went on sale in 1930, it cost about $110 uninstalled, at a time when you could buy a brand-new car for $650, and the country was sliding into the Great Depression. (By that measure, a radio for a new car would cost about $3,000 today.)

 

 

In 1930, it took two men several days to put in a car radio. The dashboard had to be taken apart so that the receiver and a single speaker could be installed, and the ceiling had to be cut open to install the antenna.

 

 

These early radios ran on their own batteries, not on the car battery, so holes had to be cut into the floorboard to accommodate them.  The installation manual had eight complete diagrams and 28 pages of instructions.  Selling complicated car radios that cost 20 percent of the price of a brand-new car wouldn't have been easy in the best of times, let alone during the Great Depression.

 

 

Galvin lost money in 1930 and struggled for a couple of years after that. But things picked up in 1933 when Ford began offering Motorola's pre-installed at the factory. 

 

 

In 1934 they got another boost when Galvin struck a deal with B.F. Goodrich tire company to sell and install them in its chain of tire stores.  By then the price of the radio, with installation included, had dropped to $55. The Motorola car radio was off and running. (The name of the company would be officially changed from GalvinManufacturing to "Motorola" in 1947.)

 

In the meantime, Galvin continued to develop new uses for car radios. In 1936, the same year that it introduced push-button tuning, it also introduced the Motorola Police Cruiser, a standard car radio that was factory preset to a single frequency to pick up police broadcasts.

 

 

In 1940 he developed the first handheld two-way radio -- The Handy-Talkie for the U. S. Army.

 

A lot of the communications technologies that we take for granted today were born in Motorola labs in the years that followed World War II.

 

In 1947 they came out with the first television for under $200.

 

In 1956 the company introduced the world's first pager; in 1969 came the radio and television equipment that was used to televise Neil Armstrong's first steps on the Moon.

 

In 1973 it invented the world's first handheld cellular phone.

 

Today Motorola is one of the largest cell phone manufacturers in the world.

 

And it all started with the car radio.

 

 

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO the two men who installed the first radio in Paul Galvin's car?

 

Elmer Wavering and William Lear, ended up taking very different paths in life.

 

Wavering stayed with Motorola.  In the 1950's he helped change the automobile experience again when he developed the first automotive alternator, replacing inefficient and unreliable generators. The invention lead to such luxuries as power windows, power seats, and, eventually, air-conditioning.

 

Lear also continued inventing.  He holds more than 150 patents. Remember eight-track tape players?  Lear invented that.

 

But what he's really famous for are his contributions to the field of aviation. He invented radio direction finders for planes, aided in the invention of the autopilot, designed the first fully automatic aircraft landing system, and in 1963 introduced his most famous invention of all, the Lear Jet, the world's first mass-produced, affordable

business jet.  (Not bad for a guy who dropped out of school after the eighth grade.)

 

Sometimes it is fun to find out how some of the many things that we take for granted actually came into being! 

 

AND It all started with a woman's suggestion!

Catastrophe Strikes, Data Destroyed! Are You Next?

by William Hoover on 10/14/14

This is a very good Ezine Article By  so I'm passing it along.

Hurricane Sandy, Black Forrest fire, 6.0 earthquake hits Napa Valley - major catastrophes strike large population centers, business are damaged and even destroyed. Even after these major events, many of which make international news, numerous companies have all of their corporate data in the same building, and, in many cases, the same room.

No matter what the business goal or high level requirements, organizations must take action, intelligent action, to protect critical data. While this may seem like common sense, it's amazing how often companies fail to perform even the most basic protection.

Nearly every business has a policy in place to cover disaster recovery, a catch all phrase to cover the need to restore data should trouble occur. In reality, disaster recovery is piece of a larger concept that includes high availability and business continuity. All of these concepts revolve around two basic ideas: recovery point objective (RPO) and recovery time objective (RTO).

There's a tradeoff between potential for data loss, duration to recover, and cost. Certain businesses require high availability, the idea of near zero data loss and near zero downtime. Examples include financial industries, healthcare, and most organizations that utilize transactional actions in data processing. In other words, anytime one has a need to trace an action from start to finish there needs to be a way to have near zero data loss and more times than not, no downtime.

Business continuity is a step down on both RPO and RTO from high availability. The idea here is not about instantaneous recovery, it's about making sure the business can continue to function after catastrophe hits. VMware and similar technologies using redundant infrastructure do a great job of providing business continuity; the key, how this environment is set up and over what distance, if any at all.

Disaster recovery covers both high availability and business continuity. Disaster recovery can also simply include a copy of data that sits on tape or a storage area network. The key here, where does that data reside. Having a copy of the information in the same location as the source data won't offer protection against nearly every major catastrophe. This "old school mindset" really only protects a business from power outage, data corruption, or system related outages. Does your business implement this simplistic disaster recovery method?

Hurricane Sandy devastated the east coast in 2013 and a number of hospitals were directly impacted. One facility, a client at the time, shut their doors after the storm due to massive damage. I recall their data center was in the basement and water rose to the 5th floor; everything in the data center was destroyed. Without offsite data storage, not only would this hospital be out of business, they would have no way to run down their accounts receivable to obtain payment for services rendered.

While working with a global storage provider that was within a couple miles of the most devastating fire in Colorado history, I found out they have zero data protection outside of their server room. If the building burned down, as did so many others during this catastrophe, this company would've gone out of business. Data is key, protecting it is fundamental.

The recent 6.0 earthquake in Napa Valley shows the need for not only private industry to understand and implement realistic and attainable disaster recovery, Government must do the same. When certain disasters strike they can impact our infrastructure including gas, electricity, and transportation. Computer systems run large amounts of critical systems including transportation signals, lighting, and gas and electric power to the populace. Without proper disaster recovery with the necessary RPO and RTO in place, a community can suffer major impact. Government cannot only consider physical infrastructure when preparing for disaster, they have to understand the information technology impact as well.

A major impetus in creating this article revolves around the discrepancy between what a business believes they have in place versus what truly exists. So many organizations, often up to and including board of director requirements, create extensive disaster recovery plans. Unfortunately, oftentimes significant variance exists between what the business says they want, and what's actually in place. Third party audits are critical to help close this gap. Before that audit can occur though, leadership has to know about and acknowledge the gap. Education is key; know there's a problem and act!

 

Job Interviews: Five Questions You Should Never Ask

by William Hoover on 09/24/14

I wish that I would have known about these before.    

From:  Career Post

During an employment interview, it's always crucial for job applicants to ask one or more questions. This is an intelligent way to demonstrate your genuine interest in a position and the employer offering it. Nonetheless, certain questions can do much more harm than good. They might reveal your weaknesses, make the interviewer suspicious or suggest that you won't be committed to the job. Continue reading to learn about five queries no potential supervisor wants to hear in an interview...

1. "What's the company policy on testing employees for drugs?" In any firm, this will trigger suspicion that you use illegal narcotics. It also suggests that you might try to defeat the test in some way. To avoid the potential risks of employing drug users, many businesses will not consider hiring someone who makes this inquiry. If you really want an answer to the question, look for it on the Internet or ask a former employee of the company.

2. "What's the policy on overtime?" This question can create at least two concerns in the interviewer's mind. He or she may suspect that you are only willing to work the minimum number of hours. On the other hand, overtime questions may suggest that you want to earn a lot of cash by working extra hours. Companies often try to save money by limiting overtime, so it's not uncommon for firms to avoid employees who have this expectation.

3. "What kind of service does your firm provide?" Career seekers always need to learn about potential employers before they schedule interviews. If you don't know anything about the company, an interviewer will doubt your interest in the job or think that you aren't good at preparing for tasks. Most businesses supply detailed information about themselves on the Internet, so it's not hard to conduct some research before an interview. When possible, try to show the hiring manager that you know about the firm.

4. "You might have already mentioned this, but..." Don't ask a question that the hiring staff has already answered in the interview, in mailed documents or on the phone. Remember that businesses use interview performance as an indicator of how well people would perform their jobs. It's vital to read and listen carefully during the process of applying for a position. If you ask a question of this type, the potential employer may doubt your ability to remember important details.

5. "When will I have a chance to be promoted?" Although it's normal to think about potential promotions when you look for a career, an employer wants you to focus on the position that he or she is trying to fill. It's important to show enthusiasm for the job that you have applied for. If the hiring manager thinks you merely want to use the job as a springboard, it may seem that you wouldn't be satisfied with that position and might leave the company if you aren't promoted soon.

By skipping these undesirable interview queries, you can greatly increase the likelihood that a firm will offer you a position or schedule further interviews. Try to ask informed questions that reflect your sincere interest in working for the company. Remember to avoid queries that suggest a lack of knowledge about any subject that someone with your qualifications should be familiar with. The appropriate number of questions to ask depends on the importance of the position and the interview style.

FCC Upgrades E-Rate With Billions in New Funding

by William Hoover on 09/23/14

I'm sharing this with you from an article by .  

Frank is a social media journalist for the CDW family of technology magazine websites.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on Friday took what many educational technology advocates called a bold first step to make high-speed Internet access affordable for all U.S. schools and libraries.

A divided commission voted 3-2 in favor of a plan to modernize the agency’s 18-year-old E-Rate federal subsidy program, which helps schools and libraries pay for telecommunications equipment. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler called the vote a “watershed moment” for the program, which has in the past let students, teachers and communities down.

“Closing the Wi-Fi gap means that millions more library patrons and students across the country will have access to opportunities that were previously denied. That’s a big deal,” Wheeler said.

The modernization effort, dubbed E-Rate 2.0 by commissioners, was years in the making and brings in an additional $1 billion to target wireless broadband connections in schools and libraries, with another billion the following year. It also eases the process for schools and libraries to apply for funds and lowers the barrier of entry for high-poverty applicants.

“We do our students no favors when we strand schools, classrooms and libraries in the industrial era. After all, we live in the digital age,” said Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel. “We need an E-Rate program designed for the digital age. We need E-Rate 2.0.”

A last-minute change to the plan allows for a so-called “safety valve” to ensure basic broadband funding does not get cut in favor of meeting the demands of wireless connections, Wheeler said.

But the modernization wasn’t enough for everyone. Even commissioners in favor of the measure said it isn’t perfect and will require more work in the years to come.

“Today's item does not make all the changes necessary to meet each and every goal, but it does make noteworthy steps in the right direction,” Commissioner Mignon Clyburne said.

The board’s two Republican commissioners went a step further, voting against the measure and issuing scathing remarks. Commissioner Ajit Pai called the massive document “158 pages of more of the same” and dismissed claims that the application process had been simplified.

“The E-Rate application process must be, as the order puts it, fast, simple and efficient. And yet, the rhetoric doesn’t match the reality,” Pai said.

Pai’s fellow Republican commissioner, Michael O’Reilly, said he and Pai had been shut out of discussion on recent drafts of the document, which he criticized as being far more expensive than expected. O’Reilly speculated that the revised E-Rate could lead to a technology “funding cliff” for schools.

The modernization of E-Rate had three goals:

  1. Close the Wi-Fi gap in schools by providing $2 billion in reserve funding, including $1 billion for wireless technologies, with another $1 billion over the next fiscal year. To acquire this funding, this shift would phase out E-Rate support for services such as traditional phone lines and pagers in favor of modern services like Voice over Internet Protocol.

  2. Maximize existing funds by streamlining the structure for E-Rate funding requests and increasing transparency. The agency also expects to see significant cost savings by leveraging a new partnership with the U.S. General Services Administration, allowing schools and libraries to consolidate their purchasing power for Wi-Fi equipment.

  3. Process applications faster and more equitably. A revised review process for E-Rate applications would cut through red tape for smaller requests. The new process would also be more equitable for schools of varying size, according to the FCC.

Implementing these proposals could increase funding for Wi-Fi equipment by up to 75 percent for rural schools and 60 percent for urban schools.

Education Advocates Praise New E-Rate

One of the largest criticisms of the E-Rate program has been its scope. Created in 1996, the program has a $2.6 billion annual budget, but for the past several years, demand has exceeded funding. A report released in May by the Consortium for School Networking (COSN) and Education Superhighway indicated that it would cost $3.2 billion to meet President Barack Obama's goal of connecting 99 percent of students to high-speed Internet by 2018 — the initiative known as ConnectED.

E-Rate 2.0 adds $2 billion over the next two years, freed from reserves, to attempt to meet that goal.

CoSN CEO Keith Kruger issued a written statement supporting Friday’s FCC vote.

"We're very pleased the FCC dedicated meaningful funding for internal connections, while also maintaining a focus on broadband connections to the school door,” Kruger said, adding that he was also grateful the agency would be studying the program’s long-term funding needs. “School districts cannot meet today’s Wi-Fi and broadband technology needs on a 1997 budget and that will mean our nation must eventually invest more for this critical need.”

The American Library Association also chimed in with its support for the modernization effort, saying that effort will help improve libraries' connections across the country.

“This order represents a solid first step toward increasing library participation in the E-Rate program and moving our communities toward the gigabit speeds increasingly needed to support Wi-Fi, digital learning and multimedia collections,” said ALA President Courtney Young in a written statement.

In the conclusion to his written statement after the vote, Wheeler acknowledged that E-Rate would continue to evolve and asked for support as the agency moved forward.

“Technology has changed. The needs of students and library patrons have changed. And now, E-rate has changed,” Wheeler wrote. “I thank all of you who have engaged with us to date and ask that you continue to work with us as we continue down the E-rate modernization path.”